Charles Ble Goude

23.04.2016 ( Last modified: 12.10.2016 )
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facts

Charles Ble Goude was born on 1 January 1972 in Niagbrahio/Guiberoua (Gagnoa) in the western center from the Ivory Coast. He belonged to the Student and school confederation of Ivory Coast (FESCI) in 1990 before obtaining his baccalaureate one year later. He occupied various stations within this organization before succeeding Guillaume Soro in 1998 at the position of secretary general.

Between 1994 and 1999-, he was imprisoned eight times for the students’ trade-union fights.

In 2001, he created the Panafrican Congress of the young patriots (COJEP) which declared a fight against imperialism and neo colonialism.

Graduate of a prominent English license and of a master in management and prevention of the conflicts, he returned to his country after having suspended his studies at the beginning of the political crisis of September 2002. He gave his support for Laurent Gbagbo and founded the Alliance of the young patriots for the national start. Following the discussed presidential election of November 2010, Charles Blé Goudé is named Minister for youth, professional training and employment.

Ble Goude has made repeated public statements recommending violence against the installations and the personnel of the United Nations, and against the foreigners; directed and taken part in acts of violence made by militia of street, including ways in fact, rapes and extrajudicial executions, intimidation of the personnel of UNO, international Working Group (GTI), political opposition and independent press, sabotage of the international radio stations; obstacle with the action of the GTI, the Operation of the United Nations in Ivory Coast (ONUCI) and of the French forces and with the peace process as defined by the resolution 1633 (2005).

Since April 11, 2011, Ble Goude remained untraceable since the attack of the armed forces of Alassane Ouattara against the Presidential palace of Abidjan held by Laurent Gbagbo and his partisans, whereas U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon issued a statement notifying the incumbent president and his followers, including Blé Goudé, of possible prosecution for war crimes.

legal procedure

Since 11 April 2011, Charles Ble Goude remained untraceable since the attack of the armed forces of Alassane Ouattara against the Presidential palace of Abidjan held by Laurent Gbagbo and his partisans, whereas U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon issued a statement notifying the incumbent president and his followers, including Blé Goudé, of possible prosecution for war crimes.

In July 2011 an international arrest warrant was issued against Ble Goude in Ivory Coast for his alleged responsibility in the post-election violence between November 2010 and May 2011.

On 17 January 2013, Ble Goude was arrested in Ghana where he was living. It was a joint police operation between the authorities of Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana. He was extradited to Côte d’Ivoire the following day.

On 21 January 2013, he was charged with war crimes, murder, theft of public funds.

Ble Goude was transferred to the Netherlands on 21 March 2014 after being held in the Ivory Coast since his arrest in January 2013

On 29 September 2014 Pre-Trial Chamber 1 confirmed four charges of crimes against humanity against Ble Goude. Charges include murder, rape, sexual violence, and other inhumane acts.

Ble Goude has stated that he was “wrongly accused”.

On 11 March 2015, the Trial Chamber of the ICC granted the Prosecution’s request to join Ble Goude’s case to that of Gbagbo. Indeed, as the two accused were facing charges arising from the same allegations, the two cases were combined to ensure the efficacy and expeditiousness of the proceedings.

A status conference was held on 21 April 2015 in order to examine some procedural aspects relating to Gbagbo and Blé Goudé’s trials.

His trial opened on 28 January 2016 in the international criminal Court. Blé Goudé and his co-accused Laurent Gbagbo pled not guilty of murders, rapes, inhuman acts and persecutions.